Pharma Tips

List of Top 10 Pharma Companies Worldwide

By: Pharma Tips | Views: 46257 | Date: 20-Oct-2012

The difference among the top 10 listed pharmaceutical, also called pharma, companies worldwide is measured in billions of dollars in sales, with a reported $315 billion in sales from United States pharma companies in 2007 alone. According to Reuters news service, the U.S. pharma complex has been strongly affected by generic drugs, research and development and competition from foreign pharma companies. Unless research and development continues strong in new drug development, as patents buy generic drugs and

List of Top 10 Pharma Companies




The following is a list of the twelve largest healthcare companies ranked here by revenue as of March 2010 according to their released 2009 annual reports.

Top 10 Pharma Companies



RankCompanyCountryTotal Revenues (USD billions)Total Revenues (reported currency in millions)Change 09/08 (%)Net income/ (loss) (reported currency in millions)Change 09/08 (%)R&D Expenses (reported currency in millions)Change 09/08 (%)Fortune 500 Ranking[1]
1Johnson & Johnson[2]United States61.90[3]$61,897-2.9$12,266-5.36,986-7.8103
2Pfizer[4]United States50.01[3]$50,0093.58,6356.67,845-1.3152
3Roche[5]Switzerland47.35[3]49,051 CHF7.58,510 CHF-21.59,874 CHF11.6171
4GlaxoSmithKline[6]United Kingdom45.83[3]£28,36816.5£5,66920.3£4,10611.5168
5Novartis[7]Switzerland44.27[3]$44,2676.8$8,4543.6$7,4693.5183
6Sanofi[8]France41.99[3]€29,3066.3€8,47117.9€4,5830.2181
7AstraZeneca[9]UK/Sweden32.81[10]$32,8043.8$7,54423.1$4,409-14.9268
8Abbott Laboratories[11]United States30.76[10]$30,7654.25,74621.42,7442.1294
9Merck & Co.[12]United States27.43[10]$27,42815.0$13,02464.2$5,80020.8378
10Bayer HealthCare[13]Germany22.30€15,9883.8€1,69638.8€1,8455.9154
11Eli Lilly[14]United States21.84[15]$21,8367.2$4,328N/AN/AN/A455
12Bristol-Myers Squibb[16]United States18.81[17]$18,8086.2$4,42019.93,6473.8


Pfizer

Pfizer has $44.4 billion in pharma sales with total revenues are at $48.4 billion and net profits and R&D each at $8 billion. The top selling drug was the cholesterol drug Lipitor at $12.7 billion.

Pfizer: 235 E. 42nd St. New York, NY 10017-5755, www.pfizer.com.

pfizer us


Pfizer has been the biggest pharma company throughout the first decade of the 21st century, and continues to set the pace and many trends in the sector.

In 2009, it addressed its biggest problem, the impending expiry of blockbuster Lipitor, by spending $62 billion in acquiring fellow US pharma company Wyeth.

Then in December 2010, the company's chief executive Jeffrey Kindler unexpectedly announced his departure, an unplanned exit believed to be down to disagreements within the boardroom.

Long-time Pfizer executive Ian Read is now at the helm, and must steer the company to safety as it hurtles towards the Lipitor patent precipice.  The company's top selling cholesterol treatment will see its US patent expire in November 2011, with its $11 billion revenues expected to be rapidly eroded.

Pfizer had continued its programme of cutbacks, adding to the plan to shed 19,000 employees in total.

Pfizer's unit in Bridgwater, New Jersey, was among the first to go after the merger, employing 300 people focuses on manufacturing and process development, and Wyeth's Great Valley building, which handled administrative functions such as information technology.

Two Wyeth facilities in Collegeville, Pennsylvania will also be closed, although the main pharmaceutical campus there will be kept as the focal point for Pfizer's speciality medicines business, including vaccines.

Wyeth's corporate headquarters in Madison, New Jersey, will stay open and take charge of diversified healthcare, including consumer and animal health businesses.

Pfizer has said it expects $4 billion in savings by 2011 from plant and programme rationalisation, on top of ongoing restructuring efforts expected to cut costs by $2 billion.

Pfizer reorganised its R&D into two units - and BioTherapeutics, led by Mikael Dolsten) and PharmaTherapeutics, headed by Martin McKay, but McKay jumped ship to lead AstraZeneca's R&D in May 2010. Pfizer responded by abandoning this twin-track approach, and put former Wyeth R&D chief Dolstein in charge of all research and development.

The merger created a total of 20 R&D sites, which Pfizer declared it would cut back to just five. Then in February 2011, it announced that it would close its European R&D headquarters in Sandwich, Kent in the UK, with the loss of 2,400 jobs.

The company says it expects to spend 30% less on R&D this year than last, dropping from its pipeline 15 drug projects, including four late-stage ones.

Pfizer’s sales decreased slightly in the first quarter of 2011 after rising revenues in specialty care and emerging markets failed to offset poor performance in the company’s largest business segment.

Primary care sales fell 7% to $5.4 billion, pulled down by declining Lipitor revenues. The blockbuster cholesterol treatment’s loss of exclusivity outside the US continued to erode its dominance and sales were down 13% in the first three months of this year to $2.4bn.

Overall revenue dropped from $16.58bn last year to $16.5bn this time, but the company was still able to produce profits of $2.22 billion in the first quarter, up from $2.02bn for the same period in 2010, following a rigorous cost-cutting programme.

Chief executive Ian Read said the results were “solid” and pointed to expected filings in the US and Europe by the end of 2011 for various products.

These include arthritis drug tofacitinib – although last month four deaths were reported in a late-stage study – and the blood-thinner  Eliquis, which has been developed with Bristol-Myers Squibb and is now being launched across Europe.

The company sold off its drug delivery unit Capsugel for $2.38 billion in April, in part to fund its ongoing share buyback programme, which Pfizer says will see the company repurchasing between $5bn and $7bn of its common stock this year.

There is still no direct word from senior management on speculation that Pfizer intends to focus on its pharma business, and will get rid of its animal, nutritional and consumer health activities at some point.

Read would only say that the company is “focused on continuing the evaluation of our business portfolio to determine the optimal mix of businesses”. “We expect to complete this evaluation during the second half of 2011,” he concluded.

Drug Name Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
Sutent Phase III Lung cancer
Oncology
Taliglucerase alfa Phase III Gaucher’s Disease
Internal Medicine
Moxidectin Phase III Onchocerciasis (River Blindness)
Infections and infestations
Zithromax/chloroquine Phase III Malaria
Infections and infestations
Neratinib Phase III Breast Cancer
Oncology
PF-299804 Phase III Lung Cancer
Oncology
PF-5208763 (Bosutinib) Phase III Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
Oncology
PF-2341066
Lung Cancer
Oncology
apixaban Phase III Acute Coronary Syndrome
Cardiology
apixaban Phase III Atrial Fibrillation
Cardiology
apixaban Phase III Venous Thromboembolism Treatment
Cardiology
Macugen Phase III Diabetic Macular Edema (Biologic) (E.U.)
Opthalmology
CP-690550 (tasocitinib) Phase III Rheumatoid Arthritis

Prevenar 13 Adult Phase III Infectious Pneumoccocal Disease (Vaccine)
Virology
Eraxis/Vfend Phase III Aspergillosis
Infections and infestations
PF-4383119 (tanezumab) Phase III Inhibitor OA Signs (Biologic)
Immunology
Bazedoxifene-conjugated estrogens (Aprela) Phase III Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms
HRT
Lyrica Phase III Post-operative pain
Pain
Lyrica Phase III Peripheral Neuropathic Pain (U.S.)
Pain
Lyrica Phase III Central Neuropathic Pain due to Spinal Chord Injury
Pain

Celebrex Phase III Gouty Arthritis
Pain
Lyrica Phase III Restless Legs Syndrome
Neurology
Lyrica Phase III Epilepsy Monotherapy
Neurology
Sutent Phase III Hepatocellular carcinoma
Oncology
Latrepirdine (Dimebon) Phase III Huntington’s Disease
Neurology
CP-751871 (figitumumab) Phase III NSCLC
Oncology
axitinib (AG013736) Phase III Renal Cell Carcinoma
Oncology
Rindopepimut -RIGHTS RETURNED SEPT 2010 Phase II glioblastoma multiform Celldex Therapeutics Oncology
Sutent Phase III prostate cancer DISCONTINUED SEPT 2010
Oncology
Latrepirdine (Dimebon) Phase III Alzheimer's
Psychiatry
apixaban Submitted Venous Thromboembolism Prevention (E.U.)
Cardiology


GlaxoSmithKline

GlaxoSmithKline, abbreviated GSK, has pharma sales of $38.5 billion, total revenues of $45.5 billion and a net income of $10.6 billion with an R&D budget of $6.6 billion. The top seller is Advair for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder treatment at $7 billion.

GSK: 980 Great West Road. Brentford, Middlesex TW8 9GS, UK, www.gsk.com.

The biggest UK-domiciled pharmaceutical company, GlaxoSmithKline has managed to maintain its industry-leading status in recent years despite relatively few new products.

Andrew Witty has been the company's chief executive since 2007, and has eschewed 'mega mergers' in favour of more external deal making and alliances. One of the most notable examples of this new approach is the creation of ViiV, a new joint venture with Pfizer which merges the companies' HIV portfolios and businesses.

Profits in 2010 were hit by problems relating to its diabetes drug Avandia, which was withdrawn in September in the EU and its use severely restricted in the US after regulators reviewed further cardiovascular risk data.

Profits after tax plummeted 56% to £3 billion for 2010 following a number of large legal charges, including a £2.2 billion hit relating to Avandia.

“There is no doubt that the scale of legal provisioning that has been required is significant,” said GSK’s chief executive Andrew Witty.

“However, I continue to believe that it is in the company’s best interests to resolve this inherent unpredictability and reduce our overall litigation exposure.”

Avandia was removed from the European market and restricted on the US market after long running studies suggested a link between the diabetes drug and a number of cardiac events.

Sales of the drug last year fell by nearly a half (44%), down to £440 million, though rumblings over its safety have been ongoing since 2007. Over the past four years GSK has lost over £1 billion in sales and the company expects this slide to continue throughout 2011.

Overall GSK’s turnover for 2010 dropped by 1% at constant exchange rates to £28.4 billion but fourth quarter results showed a 13% drop in revenue.

Its biggest seller, the respiratory drug Seretide/Advair, climbed 2% to £5.13 billion and its pandemic flu vaccine Pandemrix was the biggest climber, up 31% to £1.19 billion.

Generic erosion in the US and EU hit anti-viral Valtrex, down 60% to £532 million. Bone drug Boniva was also down by 69% to just £78 million, after GSK transferred rights to the drug in the US to Roche.

Geographically, GSK’s biggest growth came from emerging markets, with sales up 16% in the fourth quarter to £969 million.

Witty said that this was fundamentally reducing GSK’s dependency on sales of products in “white pills/Western markets”. 

Sales generated from these markets and products have decreased from 40% in 2007, to 25% in 2010, he said.

US sales took the biggest hit, with revenue dropping by 11% to £7.6 billion; sales declined by 6% in Europe to £6.5 billion, hit by the US healthcare reforms and price erosion respectively.


Drug Namesort icon Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
1363089 (XL-880) C-met kinase inhibitor Phase II Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma, gastric cancer and head & neck squamous cell carcinoma
Oncology
159797 long-acting beta2 agonist Phase II COPD (also COPD & asthma in combination with a glucocorticoid agonist)
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
159802 long-acting beta2 agonist Phase II COPD (also COPD & asthma in combination with a glucocorticoid agonist)
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
1838262 (XP13512) voltage-gated calcium channel modulator Phase II Migraine Prophylaxis
Neurology
1838262 (XP13512) voltage-gated calcium channel modulator Phase II Neuropathic Pain
Neurology
1838262 (XP13512) voltage-gated calcium channel modulator Phase III Restless Legs Syndrome
Neurology
189254 histamine H3 antagonist Phase II Narcolepsy
Neurology
221149 Oxytocin Antagonist Phase II Threatened Pre-term Labour
Obstetrics & Gynaecology
221149 Oxytocin Antagonist Phase II Threatened Pre-term Labour
Obstetrics & Gynaecology
232802 3G-selective Oestrogen Receptor Modulator Phase II Treatment of Menopausal Symptoms
Obstetrics & Gynaecology
256066 PDE IV inhibitor (inhaled) Phase II COPD
Asthma & COPD
256066 PDE IV inhibitor (inhaled) Phase II Asthma
Asthma & COPD
256066 PDE IV inhibitor (intranasal) Phase II Allergic Rhinitis
Allergic Disorders
274150 Selective iNOS Inhibitor Phase II Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatology
372475 triple (5HT/noradrenaline/dopamine) re-uptake inhibitor Phase II Depression
Neurology
468816 glycine antagonist Phase II Smoking Cessation
Smoking Cessation
573719 muscarinic acetylcholine antagonist Phase II COPD
Asthma & COPD
642444 long-acting beta2 agonist Phase II COPD (also COPD & asthma in combination with a glucocorticoid agonist)
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
649868 orexin antagonist Phase II Sleep Disorders
Neurology
679586 monoclonal antibody Phase II Severe Asthma
Asthma & COPD
681323 p38 Kinase Inhibitor Phase II Atherosclerosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
681323 p38 kinase inhibitor Phase II Neuropathic Pain (also atherosclerosis, COPD & rheumatoid arthritis)
Asthma & COPD, Cardiology, Neurology, Rheumatology
681323 p38 kinase inhibitor (oral) Phase II Rheumatoid Arthritis (also atherosclerosis,COPD II & neuropathic pain)
Rheumatology
681323 p38 kinase inhibitor (oral) Phase II COPD (also atherosclerosis, neuropathic pain & rheumatoid arthritis)
Asthma & COPD, Pain, Rheumatology
685698 glucocorticoid agonist Phase II Asthma, also COPD & asthma in combination with a long-acting beta2 agonist (also as Avamys/Veramyst for allergic rhinitis)
Asthma & COPD
742457 5HT6 antagonist Phase II Alzheimer's
Psychiatry
773812 mixed 5HT/dopaminergic antagonist Phase II schizophrenia
Neurology
842166 non-cannabinoid CB2 agonist Phase II Inflammatory Pain
Pain
856553 p38 Kinase Inhibitor Phase II Atherosclerosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
856553 p38 kinase inhibitor Phase II Depression (also atherosclerosis, COPD & rheumatoid arthritis)
Asthma & COPD, Cardiology, Neurology, Rheumatology
856553 p38 kinase inhibitor (oral) Phase II Rheumatoid Arthritis (also atherosclerosis, COPD & depression)
Rheumatology
856553 p38 kinase inhibitor (oral) Phase II COPD (also atherosclerosis, depression & rheumatoid arthritis)
Asthma & COPD
870086 novel glucocorticoid agonist Phase II Asthma
Asthma & COPD
876008 corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF1) antagonist Phase II Irritable Bowel Syndrome (also depression & anxiety)
Gastrointestinal tract, Hepatology
876008 CRF1 antagonist Phase II Depression & Anxiety (also irritable bowel syndrome)
Neurology
961081 muscarinic antagonist, beta2 agonist Phase II COPD
Asthma & COPD
Arixtra Approved Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Arzerra (ofatumumab) Phase III chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, 1st line & in relapsed patients
Oncology
Arzerra (ofatumumab) Phase III diffuse large B cell lymphoma (relapsed patients)
Oncology
Arzerra (ofatumumab) Phase III follicular lymphoma (refractory patients)
Oncology

Arzerra (ofatumumab) Phase III systemic lupus erythematosus
Oncology
Avamys/Veramyst Approved Allergic Rhinitis
Allergic Disorders
Avandamet XR Phase III Type 2 Diabetes – Extended Release
Diabetes
Avandia Phase III Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes DISCONTINUED
Cardiology, Diabetes
Avandia Submitted Prevention of Disease Progression DISCONTINUED
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Avandia + Simvastatin DISCONTINUED Phase III Type 2 Diabetes
Cardiology, Diabetes
Avodart Phase III Reduction in the Risk of Prostate Cancer
Urology
Avodart + alpha blocker Phase III Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia – fixed dose combination
Urology
Belimumab Phase III Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Urology
Boostrix Submitted Adult Booster for Diphtheria, Tetanus & Pertussis
Immunology
Bosatria (mepolizumab) Phase III Hypereosinophilic Syndrome (also severe asthma & nasal polyposis)
Cardiology, Immunology
Casopitant NK1 antagonist Phase II Depression & Anxiety (also as Zunrisa/Rezonicfor chemotherapy-induced & postoperative nausea & vomiting)
Neurology
Coreg CR + ACE inhibitor Phase III Hypertension – fixed-dose combination
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Darapladib Phase II Atherosclerosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Darotropium (233705) Phase II COPD
Asthma & COPD
Dengue fever Phase II Dengue fever prophylaxis
Immunology
Denosumab Phase III bone metastatic disease Amgen Oncology
Elesclomol (STA-4783) Phase III Metastatic Melanoma
Oncology
Entrareg/Entereg Phase III Opioid-induced Bowel Dysfunction
Gastrointestinal tract, Hepatology
Entrareg/Entereg Approved Post-operative Ileus
Gastrointestinal tract, Hepatology

Epstein-Barr virus Phase II EBV infection prophylaxis
Immunology
Farglitazar Phase II Hepatic Fibrosis
Gastrointestinal tract, Hepatology
Firategrast Phase II Multiple Sclerosis
Neurology
Flu pandemic Phase III Pandemic Fnfluenza Prophylaxis
Immunology
Flu pandemic Submitted Pandemic Influenza Prophylaxis
Immunology
Flu pre-pandemic Phase III Pandemic Influenza Prophylaxis
Immunology
Flu pre-pandemic Submitted Pandemic Influenza Prophylaxis
Immunology
Hepatitis E virus Phase II Hepatitis E Prophylaxis
Immunology
Hib-MenCY-TT Phase III Neisseria meningitis groups C & Y disease & Haemophilus influenzae type b disease prophylaxis
Immunology
Hycamtin Approved second-line therapy, Small Cell Lung Cancer
Oncology
Hycamtin Phase III Ovarian Cancer. first-line therapy
Oncology
Infanrix-IPV/Kinrix Submitted Diphtheria, Pertussis & Poliomyelitis Prophylaxis (booster-5th dose), Tetanus
Immunology
Lamictal XR Phase III Epilepsy – partial generalised tonic-clonic seizures
Neurology
Lamictal XR Approved Epilepsy – partial seizures
Neurology
Lunivia Submitted insomnia
Neurology
MAGE-A3 ASCI Phase II Treatment of Melanoma
Oncology
MAGE-A3 ASCI Phase III Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer
Oncology
MenACWY-TT Phase III CNeisseria meningitis groups AW & Y disease prophylaxis
Immunology
Mepolizumab Phase II Severe Asthma & Nasal Polyposis (also hypereosinophilic syndrome)
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
Mosquirix Phase II Malaria Prophylaxis
Immunology

New generation flu vaccine Phase III Seasonal Influenza Prophylaxis for the Elderly
Immunology
Ofatumumab Phase III Rheumatoid Arthritis (also cancer indications)
Rheumatology
Ofatumumab Phase II Relapsed Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma
Oncology
Ofatumumab Phase III Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (also rheumatoid arthritis)
Oncology
Ofatumumab Phase III Refractory Follicular Lymphoma (also rheumatoid arthritis)
Oncology
Otelixizumab (TRX4) Phase II Type 1 Diabetes
Diabetes
Remogliflozin Etabonate (189075) Phase II Type 2 Diabetes
Diabetes
ReQuip Modutab/XL Approved Parkinson’s Disease – once-daily controlled release formulation
Neurology
Revolade/Promacta Phase II Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopaenia
Oncology
Revolade/Promacta Phase III Hepatitis C
Oncology
Revolade/Promacta Phase III Long-term Idiopathic Thrombocytopaenic Purpura
Oncology
Revolade/Promacta Submitted Short-term Idiopathic Thrombocytopaenic Purpura
Oncology
Ronacaleret Phase II Osteoporosis & Fracture Healing
Osteoporosis
Rosiglitazone XR (Avandia) - DISCONTINUED 2009 Phase III Alzheimer's disease
Psychiatry
Rotarix Approved Rotavirus-induced gastroenteritis prophylaxis
Immunology
Simplirix Phase III Ggenital Herpes Prophylaxis
Immunology
Sitamaquine Phase II Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis
Infections and infestations
Solabegron Phase II Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Gastrointestinal tract, Hepatology
Solabegron Phase II Overactive Bladder
Urology
Syncria Phase II Type 2 Diabetes
Diabetes

Synflorix Submitted Streptococcus pneumoniae & non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae disease prophylaxis for children
Immunology
Tafenoquine Phase II Plasmodium Vivax Malaria
Infections and infestations
Treximet Approved Migraine – fixed dose combination
Neurology
Tuberculosis Phase II Tuberculosis Prophylaxis
Immunology
Tyverb/Tykerb Phase II Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (unresectable disease)
Oncology
Tyverb/Tykerb Phase II Refractory Inflammatory Breast Cancer
Oncology
Tyverb/Tykerb Phase III Breast Cancer brain metastases
Oncology
Tyverb/Tykerb Phase III Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (resectable disease)
Oncology
Tyverb/Tykerb Approved Refractory Breast Cancer
Oncology
Tyverb/Tykerb Phase III adjuvant therapy, Breast Cancer
Oncology
Tyverb/Tykerb Phase III Breast Cancer, first-line therapy
Oncology
Varicella Zoster virus Phase II Varicella Zoster prevention
Immunology
Volibris Submitted Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Votrient (pazopanib) Phase II Sarcoma
Oncology
Votrient (pazopanib) Phase II Ovarian Cancer
Oncology
Votrient (pazopanib) Phase II NSCLC
Oncology
Votrient (pazopanib) + Tykerb Phase III Inflammatory Breast Cancer
Oncology
Votrient (pazopanib) + Tykerb Phase II Other Cancers
Oncology
Votrient (pazopanib) + Tykerb Phase II Metastatic Breast Cancer
Oncology
Votrient (pazopanib) - APPROVED 2010 Phase III Renal Cell Cancer
Oncology
Zunrisa/Rezonic Phase III Chemotherapy-induced & Postoperative Nausea & Vomiting (also depression & anxiety)
Oncology


Sanofi-Aventis

Sanofi-Aventis had a gross pharma sales of $38.5 billion, all of the company's revenue. Net income is $9.7 billion and R&D $6.2 billion. Sanofi-Aventis' leading drug is the thrombosis medication Lovenox at $3.6 billion.

S-A: 174 Avenue de France, 75013 Paris, France, www.sanofi-aventis.com.


Safoni Aventis HQ
Sanofi's HQ in Paris

 Like all of its contemporaries, Sanofi is undergoing a thorough reinvention of its business model and working practices.

Market dynamics aside, the biggest factor behind this is the arrival in late 2008 of a new chief executive Chris Viehbacher.

Formerly a senior GSK executive, Viehbacher laid out his vision to renew the company in early 2009, and set out a strategy to have greater investment in non-prescription business sectors, and in emerging markets.

The keynote is diversification in the company's business model.  Viehbacher says the  pharma industry as a whole has until now focused on developing small molecule drugs for a western population, and now needed to become truly global in outlook, and look beyond the small sliver of the world's population currently targeted.

This would mean shifting towards lesser dependence on the blockbuster model. Viehbacher commented in his inaugural press conference in January 2009 that no pharma company had ever managed to move smoothly from one blockbuster to another without patent expiry problems.

"I don't believe that the blockbuster model is dead - I just don't believe that you can bet the ranch on delivering products of that value," he said.

He admitted that Sanofi faces problems in the next few years, with more than 20% of sales at risk from generics in the period from 2009-2013.

"Although we have a lot of exciting products in development, they are not going to be able to compensate for the loss of revenues."

Outside the prescription pharmaceutical business, Sanofi has four further divisions - vaccines (Sanofi-Pasteur MSD) animal health (Merial), an OTC portfolio and its Winthrop generics business.

Income from all these divisions is around 7.5 billion euros annually, just a fraction of the 22 billion euros generated by prescription drugs, but Viehbacher indicated that strong organic growth and further acquisitions in these areas would boost their contribution in the coming years.

R&D reorganisation

The company also announced significant reorganisation in its R&D operations, with more than 30 molecules deemed not sufficiently viable and cut from development.

A comprehensive R&D reorganisation will be announced in April, with further cuts and rationalisation expected, and the possible introduction of external experts to help evaluate a pipeline drugs potential value.

Two new posts have been created to this end. Jean-Pierre Lehner, previously head of medical & regulatory affairs will take up the post of chief medical officer. The role will involve monitoring benefit/risk in pipeline and marketed drugs. The new position reflects the companys recent troubles with Acomplia, which was pulled from the market after growing concerns about its depression side-effects.

Meanwhile Dr Elias Zerhouni has been appointed to the new role of scientific advisor. A former director of the US government research institute the NIH, Zerhouni most recently worked with the Gates Foundation on developing new drugs for poorer nations.

Viehbacher says the role will centre on helping the company hit the right balance between in-house R&D and external partnerships and focused on a broad range of global health priorities.

2009 Results

Sanofi made large gains in emerging markets, vaccines and consumer healthcare last year, helping produce 8.5 billion euros in net income for 2009, an increase of 12.8%.

Chief executive Chris Viehbacher identified five key growth factors that have driven profits forward in 2009 and will remain as the fundamental areas of the company’s future.

He cited emerging markets; diabetes brands; vaccines; consumer healthcare; and new products – namely, Multaq and Pentacel, as the company’s key growth drivers and said there were responsible for 50% of the company’s total sales.

These reached 29.3 billion euros for the year, an increase of 5.3%.

The increasing use of emerging markets was a key part of the strategy Viehbacher set out last year and in the last 12 months sales in those countries grew by19% to make up 25% of total sales.

Drug Namesort icon Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
aflibercept Phase III colorectal cancer Regeneron Oncology
Jevtana (cabazitaxel) Approved prostate cancer
Oncology
Alvocidib (Flavopiridol or HMR-1275) Phase II chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Oncology
Humenza Approved H1N1 vaccine
Virology
Iniparib (BS1-201) Phase III NSCLC
Oncology
Iniparib (BSI-201) Phase II ovarian cancer
Oncology
Iniparib (BSI-201) Phase III metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer
Oncology
Ombrabulin (AVE8062) Phase III advanced-stage soft tissue sarcoma Ajinomoto Oncology
otamixaban Phase III Acute Coronary Syndrome
Cardiology

AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca has a pharma revenue of $28.7 billion and total revenues of $29.6 billion. Net income is $8 billion and R&D budget is $5.2 billion. AstraZeneca's top seller is the acid reflux medication Nexium at $5.2 billion.

AZ: 15 Stanhope Gate, London W1K 1LN, UK, www.astrazeneca.com.


Created in 1999 from the merger of British Zeneca and Swedish Astra, the company's biggest successes since then have been ulcer drug Nexium, cholesterol treatment Crestor and antipsychotic Seroquel.

However, the last few years has seen the company bedevilled by a string of drugs which have failed in the late stages of development, or have suffered fatal setbacks once on the market.

Among the most recent of these was Zactima, which failed to gain approval in non-small cell lung cancer after an evaluation of updated results from clinical trials of the drug.

The drug gained FDA approval for the rare medullary thyroid cancer, but this is likely to be less lucrative than NSCLC.

The compound had been pitched as an important new drug candidate for AstraZeneca, which needs a new generation of products to overcome upcoming patent expiries in its portfolio on drug such as gastrointestinal Nexium (esomeprazole), Seroquel (quetiapine) for schizophrenia and cholesterol-lowerer Crestor (rosuvastatin).

There was good news in July 2011 when the FDA finally approved AstraZeneca’s blood thinner Brilinta after asking for more information on the drug. 

After twice delaying its decision on Brilinta while it waited for more data from AZ’s main phase III PLATO trial, the US regulator has now approved it for the prevention of heart attack and cardiovascular death in adult patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

Brilinta (ticagrelor) has been shown as a more effective alternative than Sanofi’s standard treatment Plavix (clopidogrel) in reducing the rate of a combined endpoint of CV death or heart attack, but was not better in preventing stroke.

The drug is expected to reach blockbuster status, and recent forecasts predict peak annual sales of around $1.5 to $3 billion.

Ongylza, a new diabetes treatment co-marketed with BMS was launched in October 2009.

R&D Cuts

In early 2010, the company announced major job losses and restructuring in its R&D operations. Nearly 3,500 R&D jobs will be affected at AstraZeneca at it exits discovery research in 10 therapeutic categories and closes down sites in the UK, Sweden and the US.

AstraZeneca says it will continue to carry out development work in all its current therapeutic categories, but will no longer conduct early-stage research in schizophrenia, anxiety and depression, thrombosis, acid reflux, ovarian and bladder cancers, systemic scleroderma and hepatitis C.

It will also cut back all vaccine research with the exception of programmes in flu and respiratory syncytial virus.

The company had already announced its intention to make staff cuts in January 2010, saying that around 8,000 would be shed across the group including 1,800 in R&D. 

Top of the list of sites affected by the decision is the Charnwood R&D facility in Loughborough, UK, which will be closed with the loss of 1,200 jobs by the end of 2011.

The Charnwood unit focuses on respiratory and inflammatory disease research and is the main development centre for AstraZeneca's pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) activities.  These activities will transfer to Moelndal in Sweden.

The company's R&D site at Alderley Park in Macclesfield will be net beneficiary of the revamp, inheriting some of this work and seeing its workforces expanded.

In the US, early-stage research will cease at its facility in Wilmington, Delaware, with the loss of around 550 jobs. Some of the employees from the unit, which specialises in psychiatric research, will transfer to AstraZeneca's Boston-based R&D operation.

In Sweden, AstraZeneca will close its R&D unit in Lund by the end of 2011. The site currently employs around 900 staff. Respiratory and inflammatory research will transfer to AstraZeneca's Moelndal site, which also focuses on gastrointestinal and cardiovascular R&D.

In May 2010, Martin Mackay took over as head of the company's research efforts.

Mackay had briefly been part of a twin track approach in Pfizer's R&D operations where he oversaw a small molecule pharmaceutical unit while Mikael Dolsten lead a separate biologics R&D unit.

AstraZeneca stats

The company focuses on six therapy areas: cancer, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, infection, neuroscience and respiratory & inflammation.

It employs over 65,000 people - 51% in Europe, 32% in the Americas and 17% in Asia, Africa and Australasia.

2008 sales:  $31.6 billion.

R&D investment 2008: over $5 billion.

Approx 12,000 people in R&D, and 17 principal R&D centres in eight countries.

26 manufacturing sites in 18 countries.


Drug Name Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areassort icon
Axanum Submitted PPI + low dose aspirin FDC

AZD1446 Phase II alzheimer's disease/ADHD Targacept
AZD1656 Phase II diabetes

MEDI-528 Phase II asthma MedImmune
dapagliflozin/metformin FDC Phase III diabetes Bristol-Myers Squibb
AZD1981 Phase II Asthma/COPD
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
MEDI-528 Phase II Asthma
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
CAT-354 Phase II Asthma
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
AZD4818 Phase II Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
AZD9668 Phase II Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
Diprivan Phase III conscious sedation
Anaesthesia
Oxis - launched Submitted COPD long acting B2 agonist
Asthma & COPD
AZD1981 Phase II asthma/COPD
Asthma & COPD
AZD3199 Phase II asthma
Asthma & COPD
Medi-563 Phase II asthma MedImmune Asthma & COPD
Medi-545 Phase II asthma
Asthma & COPD
AZD2423 Phase II COPD
Asthma & COPD
AZD8683 Phase II COPD
Asthma & COPD
AZD5423 Phase II inhaled SEGRA
Asthma & COPD
AZD9819 Phase II neutrophil elastase inhibitor
Asthma & COPD
AZD2207 Phase II Diabetes/Obesity
Cardiology, Endocrinology
AZD130 Phase II Arrhythmias
Cardiology, Endocrinology
AZD637 Phase II Diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Crestor/TriLipix Phase III Dyslipidaemia
Cardiology, Endocrinology
AZD6140 Phase III Arterial Thrombosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Onglyza (saxagliptin) Phase III Diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
AZD0837 Phase III Thrombosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Crestor Phase III Outcomes in End Stage Renal Disease
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Onglyza (saxagliptin)/ metformin FDC Phase III Diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Dapagliflozin/metformin FDC Phase III Diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Crestor - launched Phase III Outcomes in Subjects with Elevated C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Dapagliflozin Submitted Diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Brilinta/Brilique Approved arterial thrombosis
Cardiology
Kombiglyze XR / Onglyza / metformin IR FDC Phase III diabetes
Diabetes
Proton pump inhibitor Phase II Extra-Oesophageal Reflux Disease
Gastrointestinal tract
Nexium - launched EU, filed US Phase III Peptic Ulcer Bleeding
Gastrointestinal tract
AZD3355 Phase II Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) - DISCONTINUED
Gastrointestinal tract
NKTR-118 Phase II opiod induced constipation Nektar Therapeutics Gastrointestinal tract
CytoFab Phase II Severe Sepsis
Infections and infestations
Epstein-Barr virus vaccine
Post-Transplant Proliferative Disease
Infections and infestations
AZD2836 Phase II Hepatitis C
Infections and infestations
FluMist Phase III Influenza
Infections and infestations
Motavizumab - DISCONTINUED Dec 2010 Phase III RSV Prevention
Infections and infestations
Zinforo (ceftaroline) Phase III pneumonia / skin infections Cerexa Infections and infestations
CAZ104 Phase II serious infections Novexel Infections and infestations
CXL104 (CEF104) Phase II MRSA Novexel Infections and infestations
AZD6765 Phase II Depression
Neurology
AZD2624 Phase II schizophrenia
Neurology
Seroquel XR Phase III schizophrenia
Neurology
Seroquel Phase III Bipolar Maintenance
Neurology
Seroquel XR Phase III Major Depressive Disorder
Neurology
Seroquel XR Phase III Bipolar mania
Neurology
Seroquel XR Phase III Bipolar Depression
Neurology
PN400 Phase III Signs and Symptoms of OA, RA, and AS
Neurology
Seroquel XR - launched Phase III Major Depressive Disorder
Neurology
AZD3480 Phase II ADHD Targacept Neurology
AZD6244 (ARRY-142886) Phase II Solid Tumours
Oncology
ZD4054 Phase III Hormone Resistant Prostate Cancer
Oncology
Faslodex Phase III First Line Advanced Breast Cancer
Oncology
Faslodex Phase III Adjuvant
Oncology
MEDI-538 Phase II Leukaemia/Lymphoma
Oncology
Zactima (vandetanib) Phase III NSCLC - DISCONTINUED NOV '09
Oncology
Saracatinib (AZD0530) Phase II Solid Tumours and Haematological Malignancies
Oncology
Iressa - launched Phase III NSCLC
Oncology
Zibotentan Phase III castrate resistant prostate cancer
Oncology
Recentin Phase III Recurrent Glioblastoma - DISCONTINUED
Oncology
olaparib Phase II serious ovarian cancer
Oncology
AZD1152 Phase II haematological malignancies
Oncology
AZD8931 Phase II breast cancer chemo combi/solid tumours
Oncology
MEDI-575 Phase II solid tumours MedImmune Oncology
Zactima (vandetanib) Submitted Medullary Thyroid Cancer
Oncology
AZD2066 Phase II chronic neuropathic pain
Pain
AZD2423 Phase II chronic neuropathic pain
Pain
AZD0328 Phase II Alzheimer’s Disease
Psychiatry
AZD3480 Phase II Alzheimer’s Disease Targacept Psychiatry
TC-5214 Phase III major depressive disorder (adjunct) Targacept Psychiatry
TC5619 Phase II cognitive disorders in schizophrenia Targacept Psychiatry
AZD2066 Phase II major depressive disorder
Psychiatry
AZD5672 Phase II Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatology
AZD9056 Phase II Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatology
fostamatinib Phase III rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatology
AZD9733 Phase II severe sepsis Cytofab Rheumatology
CAM-3001 Phase II rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatology
medi-3250 Phase III seasonal influenza
Virology

Merck

Merck had $26.5 billion in pharma sales with $26.8 billion in total revenues. Net income of $3.3 billion and R&D budget of $4.9 billion were reported. The top pharma for asthma relief was Singulair at $4.2 billion.

Merck: One Merck Dr. / P.O. Box 100, Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889-0100, www.merck.com.


The new Merck: Developing markets, vaccines and biologics are focus for growth

 

The new Merck was launched in November 2009, following its reverse takeover of Schering-Plough for $41 billion.

The merger was Merck's response to increasingly tough trading conditions - and as with all 'mega-mergers' the union must produce improved profitablity and R&D productivity in the long term, and not simply help to cut costs.

Analysts Datamonitor forecast that the merger should return Merck to positive sales growth and provide a raft of new pipeline and marketed products.

Datamonitor calculated that a standalone Merck's prescription pharma portfolio would see sales decline for 2008-13 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of -0.3%.

Generic competition against drugs like Singulair, Cozaar/Hyzaar, Fosamax and Zocor would be largely to blame for this decline.

Despite new launches such as Isentress and Janumet, expiring products would have left Merck's 2013 sales $435 million below those of 2008.

Merck aims to focus on growth in developing markets, vaccines and biologics.

Its five divisions are global human health (GHH), consumer health care, animal health, Merck Research Laboratories (MRL) and Merck Manufacturing.

2011 performance

In early 2012, chief executive Kenneth Frazier defended his company’s ‘bumpy’ performance in 2011, and has highlighted key drugs for investors to watch.

Frazier was speaking at an investor event held by Goldman Sachs, and made a frank admission on the firm’s 2011 performance.

“Going back to last year, it couldn’t have possibly started much worse than it did, frankly.”

Merck was rocked in January 2011 when its blood thinner vorapaxar – a potential blockbuster – had to be pulled from one trial and discontinued from stroke patients in another. 

Some investors were also displeased when the firm announced it would not make further cuts to its $8.6 billion R&D budget.

This led to a drop in the firm’s stock at the beginning of the year, but shares rallied in the last few months of 2011.

Merck plans to file eight new medicines in 2012 and 2013, including two allergy medicines, drugs for atherosclerosis and osteoporosis and V503, an improved version of Gardasil, its blockbuster cervical cancer vaccine Gardasil.

“Over time, I would see more of a shift toward specialty” drugs, plus heart and diabetes medicines, Frazier said. “We’re very interested in areas like hepatitis C, HIV and rheumatoid arthritis.

Frazier also made it clear that Merck was looking to augment the pipeline and acquire drug candidates "on terms where we believe we can create value for shareholders over the long term". He added that Merck had traditionally found "the sweet spot has been earlier rather than late, but we are also looking at Phase II compounds and the occasional Phase III compounds".

He said the licensing deals with Indian generics maker Sun Pharma and the Chinese pharma firm Simcere were also major achievements in increasing its presence in emerging markets.


Novartis

Novartis had pharma sales of $25.5 billion and total revenues of $39.8 billion. It had a net income of $12 billion and R&D budget of $6.3 billion. The highest pharma sales item was the hypertension medication Diovan at $5 billion.

Novartis: Lichtstrasse 35, CH-4056, Basel, Switzerland, www.novartis.com.

Novartis
Novartis' new building, designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry

Created in 1996 through the merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz, Novartis (its name derived from the Latin for ‘new skills’) is one of Switzerland’s two major pharma companies, Roche being the other.

Among its star performers are cancer treatment Glivec, and blood pressure treatment Diovan, but the latter is approaching its US patent expiry.

In January 2010, Joe Jimenez took over as chief executive from Daniel Vasella, who had been at the helm for 14 years. Formerly head of Novartis' pharmaceutical business, Jimenez said from the outset that he would 'de-layer and simplify' the top leadership structure.

Novartis posted strong sales growth in 2010 but its chief executive warned of ‘headwinds in 2011’ as patent expiries start to bite.

Net sales for 2010 grew by an impressive 14% to $50.6 billion, buoyed by strong growth of its wet age-related macular degeneration drug Lucentis, which increased by 24% to $1.53bn.

Cancer drug Glivec also did well, growing by 8% to $4.27 billion for the full year, but Novartis faces will soon face the patent expiry of its biggest earner Diovan.

The blood pressure drug’s 2010 sales remained flat at $6.1 billion and Novartis is keen to offset the losses the lack of exclusivity will bring by diversifying its business model.

Moves towards this last year included its acquisition of Alcon, which made Novartis the world’s biggest ophthalmology company.

Novartis is also looking for future growth to come from its pipeline, which containing several dozen medicines with a number of potential blockbusters, including experimental respiratory drug QVA149.

The company has made a strong start to 2011, with the launch of its new oral multiple sclerosis drug Gilenya (fingolimod), predicted to reach $2.5 billion in peak year sales. 

Given its strong pipeline and new launches, Novartis said it expected sales growth in its core pharma division is set reach the low- to mid-single digits this year.

Jimenez said: “I am proud that Novartis continues to lead the industry in innovation, with 13 key product approvals and 16 major filings in pharmaceuticals in 2010, including our breakthrough multiple sclerosis therapy, Gilenya, which has been launched in the US.”

But he also warned of rough times ahead: “We are facing more headwinds in 2011 than in 2010 ... as this is the first year we are faced with patent expirations,” he told the Wall Street Journal.

“We expect, however, to offset the effect of these patent expirations. The fact that we expect to grow in 2011 is showing this.”


Drug Namesort icon Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
ABF656 Phase III Hepatitis C
Infections and infestations
Aclasta / Reclast Approved Male Osteoporosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Aclasta / Reclast Approved Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Aclasta / Reclast Submitted Glucocorticoid Induced Osteoporosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
ACZ885 Phase III Cryopyrin-associated Periodic Syndromes
Rheumatology
AEB071 Phase II Kidney & Heart Transplantation
Cardiology, Endocrinology
AEB071 Phase II Liver Transplantation
Immunology
Afinitor (everolimus) Approved Renal Cell Carcinoma
Oncology
Afinitor (everolimus) Phase II Solid Tumours
Oncology
Afinitor (everolimus; RAD001) Phase III Neuroendocrine Tumour
Cardiology, Endocrinology
AFQ056 Phase II Parkinson's Disease L-dopa Induced Dyskinesia
Neurology
AGO178 Phase III Depression
Neurology
AIN457 Phase II Psoriasis
Infections and infestations
ASA404 - DISCONTINUED MARCH 2010 Phase III NSCLC Antisoma, UK Oncology
ATI355 Phase II Spinal Cord injury
Neurology
CAD106 Phase II Alzheimer's disease
Psychiatry
Certican Phase II Liver Transplantation
Hepatology, Immunology
EPO906 Phase III Ovarian Cancer
Oncology
Gilenia (fingolimod; FTY720) Submitted Multiple Sclerosis Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Neurology
Glivec Phase III Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
Cardiology

Glivec adjuvant Approved Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour
Oncology
LBH589 Phase III Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma
Oncology
LBH589 Phase III Haematological & Solid Tumours
Oncology
LCI699 Phase II Hypertension
Cardiology
LCZ696 Phase II Heart Failure
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Lucentis Phase III Diabetic Macular Edema
Opthalmology
Mometasone Foradil fixed-dose combination MFF258 Phase III Asthma & Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Schering-Plough Asthma & COPD
Mometasone Indacaterol combination QMF149 Phase II Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Schering-Plough Asthma & COPD
Mometasone Indacaterol combination QMF149 Phase II Asthma
Asthma & COPD
Mycograb Phase III Meningitis NeuTec & Manchester University Haematology
NIC002 Phase II Smoking Cessation
Neurology
NVA237 Phase II Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Asthma & COPD
PKC412 Phase III Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Oncology
PKC412 Phase II Aggressive Systemic Mastocytosis
Haematology
QAB149 Phase III Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Asthma & COPD
QVA149 Phase II Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Asthma & COPD
SBR759 Phase II Hyperphosphatemia Sebo GmBH Nephrology
SMC021 Phase III Osteoporosis
Cardiology, Endocrinology
SOM230 Phase III Cushing's Disease
Cardiology, Endocrinology
SOM230 Phase III Neuroendocrine Tumour
Cardiology, Endocrinology

SOM230 Phase III Acromegaly
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Tasigna Approved Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour
Oncology
Tasigna Approved Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
Oncology
Tekturna FDC Approved Hypertension
Cardiology
Tifacogin Phase III Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia
Asthma & COPD
Tobramycin dry powder inhaler Phase III Cystic Fibrosis
Asthma & COPD
Xolair liqu. form. Approved Allergic Asthma Genentech Allergic Disorders, Asthma & COPD
Zometa Submitted Adjuvant Breast Cancer
Oncology


Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson had pharma sales of $24.9 billion and total revenues of $61.1 billion. Net income was $10.6 billion and R&D budget was $7.7 billion. The anti-psychotic medication Risperdal was the leading seller at $4.7 billion.

Johnson & Johnson: One Johnson & Johnson Plaza, New Brunswick, NJ 08933, www.jnj.com.

Chief executive William Weldon

In a sector where many of its rivals are returning to a diversified business model, Johnson & Johnson is one which never gave it up.

Johnson & Johnson is a huge company with a vast portfolio of products across three business divisions - consumer health care, pharmaceuticals and lastly, medical devices and diagnostics.

The company employs a total of around 117,000 employees in more than 250 Johnson & Johnson companies.

It says it is the world's premier consumer health care company, the world’s largest and most diverse medical devices  and diagnostics company, the fourth largest biologics company and the seventh largest pharmaceuticals company.

Transition

Like other companies, J&J is trying to manage the smooth transition from older products to newer ones, and meeting patent expiries with restructuriing and cost cutting programmes.

The company showed its success in this endeavour in the third quarter of 2009, when its profits rose, despite deep cuts into pharma sales caused by new generic competition.

Net earnings across the company's divisions rose 1.1% to $3.4 billion, despite a 5.3% dip in turnover to $15.1bn.

This was made possible by savings in its operating costs, including a 10% reduction to sales and marketing costs and 12% being shaved off R&D overheads.

This has helped the company to raise its full year forecast, which cheered investors.

Nevertheless, analysts were concerned by the steep decline seen in some products. Global pharma sales fell 14.1%, as many of its biggest earners suffered from patent loss or declining markets.

Revenue from antipsychotic Risperdal plunged 40% to $192 million as generic competitors entered the US market, where its sales fell a full 70%. The sustained release version of the drug Risperdal Consta fared better, however, with sales rising 4.4% to $353m.

Epilepsy drug Topamax also saw sales drop 76% under generic attack, while anaemia blockbuster Procrit/Eprex fell 12.4% to $542m, as safety warnings and tougher prescribing guidelines continued to reduce demand.

Alzheimer's treatment Reminyl/Razadyne also suffered a hefty blow, sales falling 29.7%, while ADHD therapy Concerta dropped 28.6% to $284m.

Rheumatoid arthritis blockbuster once again provided the good news, with sales rising 5.9% in the period to over $1bn.

Commenting on the results William Weldon, chairman and chief executive, said: "We continue to successfully manage our broad base of businesses and deliver solid earnings despite the impact of patent expirations and the challenges posed by the current economic environment."

During the quarter, the company gained US approval for its new biologic Stelara (ustekinumab) for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, as well as clearance for Invega Sustenna, an extended release of its new antipsychotic.

Simponi (golimumab), a once-monthly, subcutaneous therapy for active rheumatoid arthritis, active and progressive psoriatic arthritis and severe, active ankylosing spondylitis, gained approval in Europe.

The company also bought rights to a new Alzheimer's therapy from Elan, entered a new HIV collaboration with Gilead, and bought a stake in Dutch vaccines firm Crucell.

Acquisition trail

Johnson & Johnson made three acquisitions of mid-sized companies in 2009.

In May it bought Los Angeles-based biotech firm Cougar Biotechnology for $970 million.

The acquisition brought with it promising pipeline treatment abiraterone acetate. The drug is currently in phase II trials for prostate cancer, and is one of several drugs in the company’s oncology-based pipeline. Cougar will be part of J&J’s Ortho Biotech oncology research & development unit, itself a division of Centocor Research & Development.

Then in July, the company struck a deal with Elan to purchase all of its pipeline drugs to treat Alzheimer’s in return for a $1 billion dollar investment and $500 million to be spent on developing leading compound bapineuzumab.

Administered intravenously once every three months, (bapineuzumab), is currently in phase III. A subcutaneous formulation, administered once a week, is currently in phase II. In addition, a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease (ACC-001) is also under development.

Finally in September it acquired an 18% stake in vaccines firm Crucell, and the two companies will work together on developing monoclonal antibodies and vaccines for flu and other diseases.

J&J paid 302 million euros ($442 million) in equity and investment in the Netherlands-based firm in order to gain a foothold in the growing vaccines sector.

The partnership will focus on the development of a monoclonal antibody

Drug Namesort icon Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
Bapineuzumab Phase III Alzheimer’s Disease (Biologic) Pfizer Psychiatry
carisbamate (RWJ333369) Phase III Epilepsy SK-Bio Pharmaceuticals Neurology
ceftobiprole Submitted
Basilea Pharmaceutical Infections and infestations
ceftobiprole Submitted Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections Basilea Pharmaceutica Infections and infestations
ceftobiprole Phase III Nosocomial Pneumonia Basilea Pharmaceutica Infections and infestations
ceftobiprole Phase III Hospitalized community acquired pneumonia Basilea Pharmaceutica Infections and infestations
DACOGEN (decitabine) for Injection Phase III Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Eisai Corporation of North America Oncology
DACOGEN (decitabine) for Injection Phase III Acute Myeloid Leukemia Eisai Corporation of North America Oncology
dapoxetine Submitted Premature ejaculation PPD-GenuPro Urology
DORIBAX (doripenem)
Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Shionogi & Co. Infections and infestations
DORIBAX (doripenem) Approved Complicated Intra-abdominal Infections Shionogi & Co. Infections and infestations
DORIBAX (doripenem) Approved Nosocomial Pneumonia Shionogi & Co. Infections and infestations
DOXIL (doxorubicin HCl liposome injection) Submitted Breast Cancer (metastatic)
Oncology
INTELENCE (TMC125) Approved NNRTI HIV/AIDS treatment-experienced patients
HIV/AIDS
paliperidone palmitate IM long acting injectable Phase III schizophrenia Elan Corporation, plc Neurology
PREZISTA (TMC114) Phase III Treatment -naïve patients
Infections and infestations
PREZISTA (TMC114) Submitted Early experienced patients
Infections and infestations
PROCRIT Phase III Chronic Renal Function
Haematology
REMICADE (infliximab) Approved Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis - colectomy avoidance Schering-Plough Gastrointestinal tract, Hepatology
RISPERDAL CONSTA (risperidone) Phase III Bipolar maintenance - long acting injectable Alkermes, Inc. Neurology


rivaroxaban Submitted NNRTI HIV/AIDS treatment-naive patients
HIV/AIDS
rivaroxaban Submitted VTE Prophylaxis (Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hip and knee replacement surgery) Bayer HealthCare Cardiology, Endocrinology
rivaroxaban Phase III Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation Bayer HealthCare Cardiology, Endocrinology
rivaroxaban Phase III VTE treatment Bayer HealthCare Cardiology, Endocrinology
rivaroxaban Phase III Medically Ill Bayer HealthCare Cardiology, Endocrinology
Simponi (golimumab) Phase III Structural Damage (RA, PsA) Schering-Plough Musculo-skeletal disorder
Simponi (golimumab) Phase III Rheumatoid Arthritis (IV) Schering-Plough Rheumatology
Simponi (golimumab) Submitted Psoriatic Arthritis (SC) Schering-Plough Dermatology
Simponi (golimumab) Submitted Rheumatoid Arthritis (SC) Schering-Plough Rheumatology
Simponi (golimumab)
Ankylosing Spondylitis (SC) Schering-Plough Dermatology
tapentadol (R331333) Submitted Moderate to severe acute pain (IR formulation) Grunenthal GMBH Pain
tapentadol (R331333) Phase III Moderate to severe chronic pain (ER formulation) Grunenthal GMBH Pain
telaprevir Phase III Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated Infections and infestations
TOPAMAX (topiramate) Approved Pediatric exclusivity
Neurology
ustekinumab (CNTO 1275) Submitted Psoriasis (SC)
Dermatology
Velcade (bortezomib) Phase III Subcutaneous formulation
Oncology
Velcade (bortezomib) Phase III Mantle Cell Lymphoma 1st line Millennium Pharmaceuticals Oncology
Velcade (bortezomib) Phase III Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Millennium Pharmaceuticals Oncology
YONDELIS (trabectedin) Phase III Relapsed Ovarian Cancer PharmaMar Oncology

Roche

Roche of Switzerland reported pharma sales of $22 billion with total revenues of $38.5 billion. Net income was $9.5 billion and R&D budget was $7 billion. The breast cancer pharma Herceptin was the big seller at $2.8 billion.

Roche: Grenzacherstrasse 124, CH-4070 Basel, Switzerland, www.roche.com.


Founded by Fritz Hoffman La Roche in 1896 in Basel, Switzerland, Roche has enjoyed continuity not seen in many other pharma companies, and is still today controlled by the Hoffman family.

The fortunes of the company have waxed and waned over the years, but Roche is now most definitely enjoying a golden period, thanks to a string of successful drugs launched in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Most of this success was based on its close relatisonship with Californian biotech firm Genentech, which discovered Herceptin, Xeloda and Avastin - and in 2009 Roche moved to merge the biotech into its main operations.

Roche is now looking to its innovative late-stage pipeline to help it get back on track for the next financial year after a decline in sales for 2010.

Group sales fell 3% to CHF 47.47 billion ($50.6 billion) and pharma revenue was down by nearly 2% to CHF 37.05 billion.

The figures were skewed by sales of Tamiflu, which fell by 71%, or CHF 1.4 billion, after the H1N1 influenza pandemic petered out early last year.

But sales in Western markets also suffered twin blows from US healthcare reforms and austerity measures in Europe, leaving emerging markets to pick up some of the slack.

Roche’s oncology division saw the biggest growth across its pharmaceutical operations, with sales up 7% to CHF21.3 billion, accounting for over half of all the company’s pharma sales.

Roche’s chief executive Severin Schwann remains optimistic about Roche’s future, saying that despite a “challenging year” in 2010, the Swiss pharma firm still achieved “solid growth”.

The company did manage 4% year-on-year growth in its 2010 profits of CHF 8.9 billion, but this was partially achieved by making a 5% cut in R&D spending, which finished the year at CHF 9 billion.

Pascal Soriot, chief operating officer of Roche, said there had been not only headwinds but “cross winds” in 2010. “We look forward to the day when we can run with the winds again,” he added.

Avastin troubles

The source of one of these cross winds was Avastin’s use in metastatic breast cancer when the FDA asked for this indication to be removed after it was shown to be ineffective in phase III studies. Despite an appeal by the company, the US licence in this indication was revoked in November 2011.

Roche has forecast that sales of Avastin may actually decrease in 2011 as a knock-on effect from the FDA’s decision, and downgraded its target for the drug from CHF 9 billion to between CHF 6-7 billion.

But there was some good news for the drug in 2011, when it gained US and European approval for a new indication, ovarian cancer.

Outside its oncology franchise Roche remained strong, with arthritis drug Actemra making CHF 397 million following FDA approval in October and there was very healthy growth for ophthalmology drug Lucentis, whose sales were up 27% to CHF 1.5 billion.

Aside from Tamiflu, the biggest drop in revenue came from organ transplant treatment CellCept, which was down 15% to CHF1.29 billion as it continues to succumb to generic pressures.

Roche is set for low single digit growth for 2011 as European price erosion and the US healthcare reforms continue to impact on sales for all pharma companies in the West.

Late stage oncology

Roche has three late-stage three oncology drugs. First is its melanoma drug RG7204, a BRAF inhibitor, which gained FDA approval in August 2011. The drug has shown be shown to extend median progression-free survival life by 6.2 months in a hard to treat cancer, and is forecast to be making $1 billion in peak sales.

The second is pertuzumab in combination with Roche’s Herceptin for first line treatment of both HER2+ and metastatic breast cancer.

The third filing Roche is hoping to make will be GDC-0449 (RG3616), its hedgehog pathway inhibitor for basal cell carcinoma, a rare slow growing form of skin cancer.

The company’s hope is that these three drugs will shore up a difficult year ahead for as it continues to focus on innovation to offset the even stronger headwinds of 2011.


Lilly

Lilly reported $17.6 billion in pharma revenues with total revenues of $18.6 billion. Net income was $3 billion and R&D budget was $3.5 billion. Lilly's top selling pharma was the schizophrenia drug Zyprexa.

Lilly: Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN 46285, www.lilly.com.

Lilly

Published on 25/11/09 at 04:15pm

Founded by Eli Lilly in 1876, and now the 10th largest pharmaceutical company in the world, the company has been reinventing and intensively restructuring itself in the last few years.

The company's reforming zeal has been spurred on by the imminent patent expiry of its flagship brand, Zyprexa.

The drug is currently the world's top-selling antipsychotic, but US generic competition arrived in 2011, and 2012 will see generics bite even more deeply into revenues.

In 2009, the approval in the US and Europe of the anti-clotting drug Effient (co-marketed with Daiichi-Sankyo) was a major milestone for the company.

The FDA approved the drug for the reduction of thrombotic cardiovascular events (including stent thrombosis) in patients with acute coronary syndromes who are managed with an artery-opening procedure known as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PCI usually includes the placement of a stent to help keep the artery open.

The company cut costs and restructured, but has made strategic acquisitions.

Lilly bought ImClone in 2008 for $6.5 billion, and the company says the acquisition will make it one of the world's leaders in cancer treatment, an increasingly important field in the pharma industry.

The Year Ahead: 2012

Lilly is forecasting a drop in revenue and profits for 2012, as it prepares for life without its blockbuster antipsychotic Zyprexa.

Zyprexa (olanzapine) is licensed to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and is Lilly’s biggest selling drug, bringing in $5 billion in 2010.

But the drug lost its patent in most major markets in October, and Lilly is predicting that generics will decimate sales, which it says will plummet by $3 billion in 2012.

To make matters worse, the expiry of Lilly’s second biggest selling drug, antidepressant Cymbalta (duloxetine) will also begin in major markets at the end of this year.

This double whammy has led Lilly to forecast 2012 revenues of between $21.8 to $22.8 billion, down from revenues of $23.08 billion in 2010.

Lechleiter said there were three key elements to the company’s ‘bridging’ strategy to overcome the losses and resume growth with new products.

“First and foremost, we are replenishing and advancing our pipeline. We’ve successfully rebuilt our mid- to late-stage pipeline to position Lilly for growth post-2014, with 12 assets now in Phase III, exceeding our goal of 10 by the end of 2011.

“Second, we’re investing to drive growth in the key brands that don’t lose patent protection during this period and in our countercyclical growth engines that don’t have the same cycle of patent expirations as our US and European pharma businesses. These include Japan, select emerging markets and our animal health business.

“Third, we continue to drive productivity gains across our business to fund the R&D necessary to fuel our future growth, recapitalise our physical assets and maintain our dividend at least at its current level.”

Lilly has already said that it wants to maintain its R&D budget – where other firms are making cuts – and Lechleiter is hoping this will pay off in the long term.

Drug Namesort icon Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
A-beta antibody Phase II Alzheimer's disease
Psychiatry
Anti-CD20 (AME133v) Phase II non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL)
Oncology
Arzoxifene Phase III prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and breast cancer risk reduction
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Dirucotide Phase III secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) BioMS Medical Corp. Neurology
Duloxetine Submitted chronic pain
Pain
Efient (prasugrel) Approved prevention/reduction of atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) Daiichi Sankyo Company, Ltd. Cardiology, Endocrinology
Enzastaurin Phase III poor prognosis patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
Oncology
Exenatide Submitted monotherapy treatment of type 2 diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Exenatide Phase III Type 2 Diabetes
Cardiology, Endocrinology
LY2624803 - Discontinued DEC 2010 Phase II insomnia
Neurology
mGlu 2/3 prodrug Phase II schizophrenia
Neurology
Necitumumab (IMC- 11F8) Phase III NSCLC
Oncology
NERI IV Phase II Depression
Neurology
Olanzapine Submitted adolescent schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Neurology
Olanzapine LAI Submitted long-acting injection delivery for schizophrenia
Neurology
Olanzapine-Fluoxetine Submitted treatment-resistant depression
Neurology
Ramucirumab Phase III first-line breast cancer
Oncology
Ruboxistaurin mesylate Submitted diabetic retinopathy
Cardiology, Endocrinology
Semagacestat - DISCONTINUED AUG 2010 Phase III Alzheimer's disease
Psychiatry
Survivin ASO Phase II solid tumours Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc. Oncology
Tasisulam Phase III metastatic melanoma
Oncology
Teplizumab - DISCONTINUED DEC 2010 Phase III Type 1 Diabetes MacroGenics Cardiology, Endocrinology
Teriparatide (rDNA origin) Submitted glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP)
Cardiology, Endocrinology
TRPV1 antagonist Phase II including osteoarthritic pain, treatment for various pain conditions Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Pain

Wyeth

Wyeth reported pharma revenues of $17.2 billion and total revenues of $22.4 billion. Net income was $4.6 billion and R&D budget was $3.3 billion. The top selling drug at Wyeth was the depression drug Effexor at $3.8 billion.

Wyeth: Five Giralda Farms, Madison, NJ 07940, www.wyeth.com.



Abbott

The company is to split into two separate entities by the end of 2012

Abbott has risen rapidly in the pharma rankings in recent years, driven onwards by the runaway success of its anti-inflammatory blockbuster Humira and fast-growing sales of stents for heart patients.

The US company’s operations have been based around three divisions – pharmaceuticals, nutritional products and medical products, which include diagnostics and medical devices.

But in November 2011, Abbott’s management announced the decision to split the company into two separate entities in order to give shareholders a ‘distinct investment opportunity’.

The pharma company will be divided into two publicly traded firms: the first will focus on medical products and the other on research-based medicines.

The diversified medical products company will consist of Abbott’s existing diversified medical products portfolio, including its branded generic pharmaceuticals, devices, diagnostic and nutritional businesses, and will retain the ‘Abbott’ name.

The research-based pharmaceutical company will include Abbott’s current portfolio of pharmaceuticals and biologics and will be given a separate name at a later date.

The transaction is expected to be completed by the end of 2012, but is subject to final approval by the Abbott board of directors and other legal proceedings.

Abbott expects to incur one-time charges related to the transaction during the periods preceding the separation, to be quantified at a later date.

Both areas have produced strong revenue for Abbott, with its research pharmaceutical business generating about $18 billion in annual revenue, while the medical products area made $22 billion, according to a 2011 report by the US firm.

Miles White will remain chairman and chief executive of Abbott, the diversified medical products company.

Richard Gonzalez, currently executive VP of global pharmaceuticals, will become chairman and chief executive of the as-yet unnamed research-based pharmaceutical company.

Gonzalez said: “The research-based pharmaceutical company will be a leader in its industry with a strong and sustainable portfolio of specialty medicines and a promising pipeline of future products.

“This business has been delivering market-leading performance and is well positioned for future success.”

The company said it expects the companies will each pay a dividend that, combined, will equal the current Abbott dividend at the time of separation.

Humira, which is licensed to treat a number of autoimmune diseases, is Abbott’s best-selling drug, with sales of $6.5 billion in 2010, representing a third of the research based pharma unit’s sales.

The company has also recently been granted FDA approval for its ALK gene test to be used alongside Pfizer’s new non-small cell lung cancer drug Xalkori (crizotinib), which is forecast to make blockbuster sales.

Abbott launched its TNF-a blocker drug Humira (adalimumab) in 2002, and the drug has been the company’s greatest engine of growth ever since.

Despite being third to market behind Amgen/Pfizer’s Enbrel and J&J’s Remicade, Humira is now one of the industry’s biggest products.

In 2009, sales of the drug grew 21%, bringing revenues to $5.48 billion.

Abbott now claims Humira has a market-leading position in many international markets, including the number one share position in Western Europe.

The company also has a significant stake in the lucrative lipid management market, based on its niacin-based products, including TriCor/Trilipix and Niaspan.

In September 2009, the company bought Solvay Pharmaceuticals. The Belgium-based company adds more than $3 billion in annual sales to Abbott’s revenues, mostly outside the US and with significant presence in emerging markets.

Facts & Figures

Chairman and Chief Executive: Miles D. White

Corporate Headquarters: North suburban Chicago, Illinois, USA

Pharmaceutical Research Centres:

Abbott Park and North Chicago, Illinois, USA
Parsippany, New Jersey, USA
Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Ludwigshafen, Germany

Drug Namesort icon Phase Indication Partnership Therapy Areas
ABT-874 Phase II moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis
Immunology
daclizumab Phase III multiple sclerosis
Immunology
Hep C candidate Phase II Hepatitis C
Virology


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